Press Release

Friday, August 23, 2019

The author of legislation that would require students to take an ethnic studies course as a requirement for high school graduation has put off a vote on the bill this year amid widespread criticism of a proposed curriculum that would serve as a guide for school districts statewide.

“It is not a question of whether the subject itself is necessary but rather, how do we ensure the curriculum is comprehensive, rigorous and inclusive enough,” Assemblyman José Medina, D-Riverside, said in a statement on Thursday. “This underscores the importance of taking the time necessary to ensure we get the curriculum right.”

Thursday, August 22, 2019

A proposed law that would require all California high school students take an ethnic studies course is on hold for this year after the draft curriculum prompted weeks of escalating controversy from diverse groups whose members said they were misrepresented or excluded.

The Thursday decision by the bill’s author quells weeks of critiques from leaders of pro-Israel organizations, who challenged the lack of teaching about anti-Semitism , and organizations representing Armenians, Greeks, Hindus and Koreans, whose members want lessons about their people to be taught. Meanwhile, a broad coalition of student groups and educators, mainly people of color, rallied in support of the current draft. In the midst of the critiques, state educators announced that the first draft of curriculum fell short and would be substantially revised.

Thursday, August 22, 2019

RIVERSIDE, CA— Assemblymember Jose Medina (D-Riverside) released the following statement on the status of the draft Ethnic Studies Model Curriculum and AB 331, which would make Ethnic Studies a graduation requirement.

Monday, August 12, 2019
Wednesday, August 7, 2019
Team Medina and Team TODEC serve pancakes to constituents
Assemblymember Medina with constituents
Assemblymember Medina provides a legislative update to constituents
Assemblymember Medina provides a legislative update to constituents

Assemblymember Medina hosted a free pancake breakfast with TODEC Legal Center. Where constituents had the opportunity to discuss current legislation and address constituent concerns. TODEC Legal Center presented on:

  • Necessary steps and requirements on becoming a U.S. Citizen
  • "Know your rights"
  • New state and federal immigration la
Thursday, August 1, 2019
Team Medina ready to greet constituents and provide them with resources
Team Medina and Team TODEC serve pancakes to constituents
Assemblymember Medina provides a legislative update to constituents
Assemblymember Medina with constituents

Assemblymember Medina hosted a free pancake breakfast with TODEC Legal Center. Where constituents had the opportunity to discuss current legislation and address constituent concerns. TODEC Legal Center presented on:

  • Necessary steps and requirements on becoming a U.S. Citizen
  • "Know your rights"
  • New state and federal immigration laws.
Tuesday, July 9, 2019

A California bill that would make it possible for a college athlete to profit from the use of his or her name, images and likeness passed another subcommittee hurdle in the legislative process Tuesday afternoon.

The state assembly's Committee on Higher Education voted 9-0 to move the bill forward, and chairman Jose Medina called the NCAA's threats and requests to slow down the legislative process during the past couple months "akin to bullying."

"I don't take too fondly to threats to the state of California regardless of where they come from," Medina told ESPN on Tuesday evening.